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Check out some recent Registered Statements from citizens

Name not shown inside District 2 April 7, 2017, 4:56 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #2: Open four roads including including Bear Creek Road in the Woody Creek area, Seller Lake, Deimer Lake, and Powerline Roads in the Fryingpan River drainage.


Do you have any other additional comments?
Lets take care of existing roads in Pitkin County and insure seasonal users and the Braun Hut System have reasonable access before constructing new roads that fragment our wild spaces further. I'm not opposed to road construction outright but I believe it is more important to have well maintained roads and staff to properly maintain them. If we expanded the road network further, does Pitkin County has the resources and manpower to maintain them? Lets keep what we have in good condition because our mountain road access is already pretty good. Keep OHV's off county roads- already enough pressure on them.

Elizabeth Boyles inside District 1 April 7, 2017, 4:51 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #1: Status quo approach where all county roads would remain off limits to OHVs and ATVs according to state law


Do you have any other additional comments?
OHVs and ATVs cause enormous wear and tear on County roads and do not contribute to the maintenance costs of repairing the roads.

Morgan Boyles inside District 1 April 7, 2017, 4:28 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #1: Status quo approach where all county roads would remain off limits to OHVs and ATVs according to state law


Do you have any other additional comments?
Dear Pitkin County BOCC,

My name is Morgan Boyles and I manage the Alfred A. Braun Hut System. Our concerns are focused on the rapidly degrading condition of the Express Creek, Richmond Ridge, and Perl Pass roads. We are a very important local stakeholder in this conversation: for 54 years we have been able to rely on the Express Creek, Perl Pass, and Richmond Ridge roads to supply and work on the huts. The roads are deteriorating due to increased use, a large part of which is due to recent surge in the popularity of large OHVs (in particular vehicles like the RZR). This growing abuse of the roads and a lack of maintenance has the huts greatly concerned that our access will become increasingly difficult, if not eventually impossible for our work trucks.

The Braun huts is a small 501c3 nonprofit that owns and operates the seven huts up castle creek: Barnard, Goodwin-Greene, Markley, Lindley, Tagert, Green-Wilson, and Opa. This is the oldest hut system in the West and we are a key part of the ski history of our valley as the earliest documented use of ski cabins in the Montezuma basin was in 1937. The Braun huts were founded in 1963, we have provided warmth and shelter to backcountry travelers for over fifty years. Each winter we have over 6,000 visits from backcountry skiers.

Though we are closed in the summer this is our busiest maintenance season (we do have some summer visitors in the form of student volunteer groups from a number of local schools). From July through the end of September we restock the huts with firewood, propane, and supplies. One of the most difficult tasks is getting a septic pumping truck with a 500 gallon tank to pump out the outhouses.
The roads up Castle Creek are in awful condition; they were never great to begin with as miners built them at steep grades that do not handle erosion well. In recent years, however, we have noticed an increase in road damage. Though this is a tragedy of the commons situation a lot of the increased damage correlates to the surge in the use of RZRs and other large OHVs on these roads.

We are thankful for any work that the county does on the roads when they can do work. Their resources for rough rural roads are stretched thin among their 254 miles of roads and eight employees. Each year maintenance becomes more difficult as there is limited material to work with as the roads erode. It is hard for their work to keep pace with the rapid increase in use which has resulted in significant resource damage: braided roads, compacted tundra, erosion, deep rutting, loss of road base, destruction of water bars etc.

The Braun also does a fair amount of volunteer road maintenance, clearing downed trees, large rocks, opening water bars etc. We are very disappointed that we do not see tools (pick axe shovels etc) on any RZRs or side by sides. We are also very disappointed that there is no local group of users that helps with the maintenance on the shared resource of the road. We all have impact and so ALL of the users should participate in supporting the continued existence of these tenuous roads.

The simple fact of this situation is that with the current amount of maintenance and the rapid increase in use we will start to lose the ability to travel these roads in 4x4 trucks as they degrade. The sad part is that we have relied on these roads (and the county to uphold their responsibility to maintain them) for 54 years to provide an affordable backcountry experience to locals and visitors alike. Now we wonder how much longer we will be able access the huts to do the work that we need to do to provide our services and public access to these wonderful public lands.

Imperfect as the scenarios are we cannot support any option that increases motorized use numbers on the Express Creek, Perl Pass, and Richmond Ridge roads as increased use with the current lack of law enforcement and road maintenance will threaten our ability to operate our non-profit which provides affordable public access to the upper Castle Creek Valley.

Thank you,

Morgan Boyles
Alfred A. Braun Hut System Manager


Name not shown inside District 1 April 7, 2017, 4:28 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #1: Status quo approach where all county roads would remain off limits to OHVs and ATVs according to state law


Do you have any other additional comments?
Observe the stated law, #1

Adam McCurdy inside District 2 April 7, 2017, 4:03 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #2: Open four roads including including Bear Creek Road in the Woody Creek area, Seller Lake, Deimer Lake, and Powerline Roads in the Fryingpan River drainage.


Do you have any other additional comments?
In conversations with county staff it sounds like there is no plan for enforcement, management, and restoration if the use of county roads by OHVs is increased. Without mechanisms to ensure there is minimal damage to the landscape from increased use I am against scenarios 3 and 4.

Jeffrey Colt outside County Districts April 7, 2017, 3:44 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #1: Status quo approach where all county roads would remain off limits to OHVs and ATVs according to state law


Do you have any other additional comments?
Please preserve the roads that lead into our national forest and beautiful peaks. The scenery is wonderful, but the sounds of nature are what is at risk. Additional traffic and noise from off road vehicles will make for a noisier outdoor experience. There are few places without sounds of human intervention, let's keep the Elks one of those sacred places!

Name not shown inside District 5 April 7, 2017, 2:07 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #1: Status quo approach where all county roads would remain off limits to OHVs and ATVs according to state law


Do you have any other additional comments?
Dear BOCC ~
As a Pitkin County native of 60+ years, I strongly support scenario #1, based on having watched the increasing growth in human pressures on our local wildlands. Rich Doak, of the White River National Forest, during the Feb 28th BOCC meeting, made clear that once you open the door to motorized recreation (OHV's & ATV's) it is very hard, if not impossible to back track. Many of his points reinforced my understanding of the situation:

. In Pitkin County the US Forest Service is managing for skiing, wilderness and roadless non-motorized recreation as defined in the latest forest management plan. Motorized recreation is not a priority.

. Their approach is to keep an area closed to motorized recreation, unless there is a strong reason to open it. The White River National Forest doesn't need any more motorized recreation, as it already has enough.

. Motorized recreation (OHV/ATV) is not compatible with the above FS focus, which emphasizes the opportunity for solitude and "getting away from it all".

. OHV's/ATV's have a big impact beyond the "road prism" with their noise, air pollution, and the tendency to go off-road with the resulting damage.

. OHV's/ATV's are hard to manage.

. Recreation pressures are only going to increase and with that, more conflicts between users.

. There are many other places in the White River National Forest that allow OHV/ATV recreation opportunities.

In addition to these points, I feel that scenario's #3 & 4, would open up the county to all kinds of recreation user conflicts. North Star is an example of unpredictable expansion of recreation pressure that has threatened to overwhelm the intent of quiet float within a wildlife sanctuary.

Once commercial ventures get involved, and a pattern is established, things can very quickly get out of hand as is happening on Aspen Mountain with OHV/ATV traffic.

Opening up Prince Creek/Dinkel Lake (#3), would provide easier access to the Crown & BLM lands which are already seeing impacts on wildlife from the biking community. Under #4, E. Sopris Creek could be fair game as well, with impacts on Light Hill, which CPW considers important wildlife habitat. It gets complicated...

I would recommend that the BOCC back up the US Forest Service, and choose non-motorized over over motorized recreation as their priority in this decision. Let's be pro-active and protect the outstanding opportunities we still have for non-motorized recreation, where solitude is still an option.

Thank you for allowing involvement in this process!


Dan Bunta inside District 3 April 7, 2017, 1:31 PM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #2: Open four roads including including Bear Creek Road in the Woody Creek area, Seller Lake, Deimer Lake, and Powerline Roads in the Fryingpan River drainage.


Do you have any other additional comments?
I do not see how rental OHVs and ATVs fit in with the current Rural and Remote Zoning. These vehicles travel way to fast and are way to loud!
The "Mega-Wedding" hosted in Little Annie Basin had way little impact compared to the "Side by Side's" racing around in the Basin in the summer.
Amplified outdoor music is illegal but letting these super loud muffler dune buggies fly around the very poplar hiking area of Little Annie road is crazy. I have seen small children, not of legal driving age, driving ATVs and OHV's in very dangerous manner. Follow the forest services led on this topic and pick Scenario #2 . Little Annie Basin can tolerate jeep tours, rental jeeps, hikers and mnt. bikers but please don't allow these roads to be the next Baja 500 training grounds!

Name not shown inside District 4 April 7, 2017, 11:28 AM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #4: Open all county roads with less than 100 vehicle trips per day to OHVs and ATVs. This option includes opening the backside of Aspen Mountain to the vehicles.


Do you have any other additional comments?
The commercial operators seem to be the problem, maybe eliminate them?

Douglas Hall outside County Districts April 7, 2017, 8:46 AM

Please choose your preferred option for managing unlicensed Off Highway Vehicles (OHVs) on county roads. You will have the opportunity to comment further in the space provided below.
Scenario #4: Open all county roads with less than 100 vehicle trips per day to OHVs and ATVs. This option includes opening the backside of Aspen Mountain to the vehicles.